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Tag Archives: Bible study

  1. News & Articles : Adult Church School: Program Offerings for the Fall

    Bible Roundtable: A Closer Look at the Apostle Paul
    Beginning Sept. 16, 2018
    Sundays, 9:45-10:45am, Room 207
    Facilitators: Gene Brannon, Eric Wolf

    Missionary, theologian, and religious genius, Paul is one of the most powerful human personalities in the history of the Church. Many of us are familiar with the letters written by the Apostle Paul, but what do we know of Paul the man? This year we will first explore the life, mission, and thought of the apostle Paul before exploring one of his letters. Whatever your knowledge level, you will find this class insightful and compelling.

    Adult Church School Elective, Term 1: alongside: A Practical Guide for Loving Your Neighbor in Their Time of Trial
    Beginning Sept. 16, 2018
    Sundays, 9:45-10:45am, Room 204
    Facilitators: Betsy Mangum, Richard Watson, Marty Warburton, JoAnn Lytle-Olson

    Whether it’s cancer, death of a loved one, long-term illness, loss of a beloved pet, or another significant challenge, we all know someone facing trials. What can we do to help? How many times have you wanted to do the practical thing when someone you know is in a hard place, but had no idea where to start? In this collection of stories, we’ll explore what is actually needed and what is truly appropriate depending on the depth of the relationship.


  2. News & Articles : Spring 2018: Monday Morning Study

    Lost Christianities: Christian Scriptures and the Battles over Authentication by Bart Ehrman

    Mondays beginning January 22
    10am-12pm in Room 105
    Facilitator: Heather Ferguson

    In the first centuries after Christ, there was no “official” New Testament. Instead, early Christians read and fervently followed a wide variety of Scriptures – many more than we have today.

    Relying on these writings, Christians held beliefs that today would be considered bizarre. Some believed that there were two, 12, or as many as 30 gods. Some thought that a malicious deity, rather than the true God, created the world. Some maintained that Christ’s death and resurrection had nothing to do with salvation while others insisted that Christ never really died at all.

    What did these “other” Scriptures say? Do they exist today? How could such outlandish ideas ever be considered Christian? If such beliefs were once common, why do they no longer exist? These are just a few of the many provocative questions that arise from “Lost Christianities: Christian Scriptures and the Battles over Authentication.”